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How to Allergy-Proof Your Home

Allergies are extremely common in America with millions of Americans suffering from symptoms.

The most common household allergies are seasonal, which run from February to early summer, and animal allergies which can pose a risk at any time.

There are some ways you can limit some of the allergens in your home, whether you want to make your house more allergy-proof for yourself and family or your guests.

Seasonal allergies

There are a number of plant pollen and mold allergies that are common throughout the United States. During pollen season, especially on dry, windy days, these pollens are spread everywhere.

Many people who experience seasonal allergies watch local pollen levels in their area to prepare themselves for peak days when they are most likely to experience symptoms. During these times, it’s best to keep doors and windows completely shut. This includes your home, garage, and vehicle.

To clean up after times of high pollen levels, it’s a good idea to first vacuum and then use a damp cloth to dust household surfaces. The moisture will trap pollens and prevent them from escaping back into the air.

When it comes to mold, there are a number of preventative measures you can take in your home. The most important thing you can do is avoid excess moisture in your home. You can do this by using a dehumidifier, monitoring water pipes, and cleaning spills and leaks immediately after they happen.

Animal allergies

Pet owners love their pets. But the pet dander that comes with them is a leading cause of allergies. To help mitigate pet allergies in your home, focus on the areas where your pets spend the most time. If your pet sleeps on your bed or has their own bed, wash the bed linens frequently.

Since most pets spend their days inside your home, roaming the floors, it’s important to vacuum frequently with a high-efficiency vacuum cleaner. High-efficiency machines that are sealed properly and use effective filters are much better at reducing the amount of dust that escapes during vacuuming and when you empty the vacuum itself.

Air filters

The filter on your vacuum isn’t the only one necessary for reducing allergy-causing particles in your home. Heating and ventilation systems also come with air filters that need to be cleaned or replaced.

When replacing your filter, look for one that is HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) certified to remove the most allergens possible.

Don’t forget the backyard

Since many allergies are carried in on the wind and shoes entering your home from the outside, it’s important to understand which allergens you might be growing in your backyard. Some trees, grasses, and plants cause higher levels of allergies and are more likely to cause symptoms to you and your guests.

Even the most common trees like pine and maple can be problematic for some people, so it’s important to know what you’re allergic to and whether you should take steps to landscape away some of those allergens.